Living near to forested area of natural Australian Bush, risk assessment has long been an ally of my thinking in terms of fire. There are some risks that can be controlled like making sure boundaries are clear of debris, keeping gum tree branches from overhanging or being too near to the house, and not lighting up the barbie on fire risk days. Of course, there are also risks that can’t be controlled, like the nature of wood to burn or the nature of fire to spread, and pyromaniacs!

So what has risk assessment got to do with the heart?

Well, risk factors apply to anything and of all the risk factors we can consider in our life, cardiovascular disease is a risk salient to us all. The World Health Organisation stats to-date show cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, with nearly 18 million lives lost each year.

Though it is early days in terms of research, several scientific studies and clinical trials have been undertaken in the use of mindfulness meditation and heart disease. In 2017 The Journal of the American Heart Association released a ‘Scientific Statement’ about it. It was entitled “Meditation and the Cardiovascular Risk Reduction” in relation to the use of meditation as an adjunct to guideline directed risk reduction. (1)

The Statement is referenced from no less than 69 scientific studies on the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation and heart health including cholesterol reduction, stress reduction, decreases in blood pressure, anxiety, depression and much more.

A particular area I find interesting is the use of mindfulness meditation increasing heart rate variability (HRV) – a measure of how quickly your heart can make changes between beats, with a high rate indicating a healthier heart.

Another study, released by the National Society of Medicine for the National Centre for Biotechnology Information, (2) found that mindfulness meditation decreased acute psychological stress and increased sleep quality.

Doubtful or not, taking up the practice of mindfulness meditation may help you mitigate some risks associated with cardiovascular disease.

There are many mindfulness meditations freely available on our resources page to help you do just that.

(1) https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.117.002218
(2) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33332403/

For health and well-being meditations go to our Meditations page.

AL

Please Note: No content on this site should be used as a substitute for medical advice from your doctor.

are some risks that can be controlled like making sure boundaries are clear of debris, keeping gum tree branches from overhanging or being too near to the house, and not lighting up the barbie on fire risk days. Of course, there are also risks that can’t be controlled, like the nature of wood to burn or the nature of fire to spread, and pyromaniacs!
So, what has risk assessment for fire got to do with the heart?
Well, risk factors apply to anything and of all the risk factors we can consider in our life, cardiovascular disease is a risk salient to us all.
The World Health Organisation stats to-date show cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, with nearly 18 million lives lost each year.
Though it is early days in terms of research, several scientific studies and clinical trials have been undertaken in the use of mindfulness meditation and heart disease. In 2017 The Journal of the American Heart Association released a ‘Scientific Statement’ about it. It was entitled “Meditation and the Cardiovascular Risk Reduction” in relation to the use of meditation as an adjunct to guideline directed risk reduction. (1)
The Statement is referenced from no less than 69 scientific studies on the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation and heart health including cholesterol reduction, stress reduction, decreases in blood pressure, anxiety, depression and much more.
A particular area I find interesting is the use of mindfulness meditation increasing heart rate variability (HRV) – a measure of how quickly your heart can make changes between beats, with a high rate indicating a healthier heart.
Another study, released by the National Society of Medicine for the National Centre for Biotechnology Information, (2) found that mindfulness meditation decreased acute psychological stress and increased sleep quality.
Doubtful or not, taking up the practice of mindfulness meditation may help you mitigate some risks associated with cardiovascular disease.
There are many mindfulness meditations freely available on our resources page to help you do just that.

(1) https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.117.002218
(2) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33332403/

Please Note: No content on this site should be used as a substitute for medical advice from your doctor.