The pre-frontal cortex is the area of the brain that is thought to be involved in planning and complex cognitive behaviours and in the expression of personality and appropriate social behaviour.

What separates us from all other sentient species is that the frontal lobe of our brain is the most developed. This is what makes us human and differentiates us from other animal species.

The pre-frontal cortex forms at least 30% of the human brain (compared to 11% in chimpanzees and 7% in dogs) and is the location of the executive functions of the brain.

This is where we exercise forethought, control, judgement, empathy, and learning from experience.

The pre-frontal cortex is the place where free will is located. Where there is a ‘free will’ then please understand that there is also a ‘free won’t’; that is to say that we also have the ability to say ‘no’. The frontal lobe is, in fact, also the place where the ‘free won’t’ is located; that executive inhibitor of response that stops us running amok.

When there are problems here, we see patterns of procrastination. Bad judgement and a lack of learning from experiences are all evident. Some symptoms include a lack of focus, low energy, and a need for a crisis to work properly.
Crisis, or the sense of crisis or conflict, stimulates activity in the brain.

Have you ever worked with people who only seem to thrive when there is a crisis? Dr Amen suggests that the treatment for these problems is:
• Writing down goals for all areas of your life and repeating them daily
• daily exercise
• high protein and low carbohydrate diet (only if this is your area of difficulty); and
• fish oil.

So, if this is where your free will is located, then what is free will?

Free will is the ability to consciously make a choice.

In choosing you are always selecting a future. Your future is not pre-determined. We do not live in a Newtonian mechanical universe.

Free will and quantum physics resonate with each other as we live in a sea of possibility and probability, creating multiple futures, each carrying their different possibilities.

What does this have to do with us and the Law of Attraction?
We know that we can use our pre-frontal cortex in mental rehearsing or visualisation to enhance performance as it is successfully used by coaches and athletes. It is also used by actors and concert pianists. Mental rehearsing helps the mind, or imagination, ‘make it so’.

Brain scans show that imagining an activity and doing it are not that different, which is why this works. This demonstrable fact, which is replicated every day the world over, can be used to your great advantage.

In an interview in the film What the Bleep, Dr. Joe Dispenza illustrates this with a personal example:

‘I wake up in the morning and I consciously create my day the way I want it to happen. Now sometimes, because my mind is examining all the things that I need to get done, it takes me a little bit to settle down and get to the point of where I’m actually intentionally creating my day. But here’s the thing: When I create my day and out of nowhere little things happen that are so unexplainable, I know that they are the process or the result of my creation. And the more I do that, the more I build a neural net in my brain that I accept that that’s possible. [This] gives me the power and the incentive to do it the next day.’’

Situationally, not only is performance enhanced through the process of mentally creating the day, but the subsequent events of the day then have a quantum like predisposition to draw into themselves the necessary ingredients to facilitate the envisaged outcome.

Unfortunately, most people only make partial use of the frontal lobe and so could be said to be operating with a ‘frontal lobe lobotomy’, choosing to respond to situations in a habitual manner and with habitual behaviour. Because what we think we know is always going to be limited, we tend to get stuck in how to change our thinking. In any event we also prefer habitual thinking to the effort of creating our day. We have a vague ‘what will be, will be’ approach that while not making us victims certainly makes us inattentive to our attitudinal address to life.

This may be so because we do not believe how we think about things is going to make much of a difference anyway…… How wrong we are!

 

Guest Blog by Dr Brian Gordon, OAM
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